What Can Brown Do For You? The Tampa Bay Bucs Are Learning Trouble Has A Way Of Chasing Down And Tackling Antonio Brown.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers wide receiver Antonio Brown (81) before an NFL football game against the New Orleans Saints Sunday, Nov. 8, 2020, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Mark LoMoglio)

Anyone think Antonio Brown is a changed man now that he’s back with Tom Brady, back in the NFL and making plays on Sundays? Sounds like the jury is still out on that. 

Reports circulated this week that Brown was accused in October by Florida’s Hollywood Oaks homeowners association of all kinds of un-neighborly type things, including destroying a security camera and throwing a bicycle at a security guard.

The Hollywood Police felt they had probable cause to charge the wide receiver with criminal mischief, but the president of the association declined to press charges. Her reason? She told police she feared Brown “may retaliate against her employees.”

If there’s any doubt that drama just seems to constantly follow Brown, his spokesperson told the Miami Herald that issues between the homeowners association and Brown “have been fully and amicably resolved, and everyone is getting along just fine.”

So everything is cool? A big misunderstanding? Not really, as the spokesperson sent a second statement to the Miami Herald, saying this time, “Antonio regrets that he lost his cool that day and he has made amends with the HOA.”

How about the Bucs? Any buyer’s remorse for what they signed up for in a quest to play a Super Bowl in their home stadium in February? They issued their own release Monday that in part said “We are aware of the reported incident involving Antonio Brown prior to his signing. When Antonio joined us, we were clear about what we expected and required of him. Thus far, he has met all the expectations we have in place.”

Stay tuned. If there’s one thing we’ve learned about Brown is staying under the radar screen is not his style.

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