Flying Somewhere For The Fourth Of July?  Good Luck!

Delta Air Lines planes are shown at their gates at Salt Lake City International Airport Thursday, June 30, 2022, in Salt Lake City. Airlines that have stumbled badly over the last two holidays face their biggest test yet of whether they can handle big crowds when July Fourth travelers mob the nation's airports this weekend. Problems were popping up well before the weekend, with some disruptions caused by thunderstorms that slowed air traffic.(AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

If you don’t like stress, are terrible at thinking on your feet, and hate being in crowded places for long periods, I highly suggest you celebrate the 4th of July in your neighborhood. 

Don’t drive anywhere too far because gas prices could crush you, and whatever you do, stay away from airports and airplanes because it looks like it’s going to be one heck of a rough weekend. 

If you are not holding a ticket for a flight this weekend, sit back and listen to these numbers and shake your head. If you are hoping to board a jet, you may want to reach for a stiff drink. 

On Thursday, 5,827 flights were delayed, and another 639 just flat out canceled. 

Newark, New Jersey, and Denver are places to avoid, as they lead the nation in cancellations at 49 and delays at 349. 

In June, over 750,000 passengers had their flights impacted just by American Airlines.  75,000 people flying on American have had delays just in the past two days. 

United is not immune to the chaos, as they canceled roughly 4% of their flights this week. 

A big part of the problem is that airlines don’t have the staffing to keep planes in the air. They completely botched the pandemic and furloughed way too many pilots, and it is now biting them in the butt. Many of those pilots have taken early retirement, and the art of flying has turned into a clown show, with millions and millions of people affected by the airline’s ineptness. 

Delta pilots not flying planes will start carrying picket signs at LAX, JFK, and Atlanta this weekend.

It’s not a shining moment for anyone associated with the airline industry, especially those in charge. Driving won’t be much of a picnic either, as AAA expects 48 million Americans will be traveling by car during the Fourth, with gas prices 56% higher than a year ago. 

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