More Misery In Texas. Now Some People Are Facing 5 Figure Electric Bills As Cold Snap Continues!

People wait in line to fill propane tanks Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021, in Houston. Customers waited over an hour in the freezing rain to fill their tanks. Millions in Texas still had no power after a historic snowfall and single-digit temperatures created a surge of demand for electricity to warm up homes unaccustomed to such extreme lows, buckling the state's power grid and causing widespread blackouts. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

OK, enough is enough, winter, leave Texas alone.

On the heels of a freezing assault this week that brought record-low temperatures, snowstorms, burst pipes, power outages and deaths, many Lone Star State residents are being hit in the wallet.

Texans are seeing skyrocketing electric bills due to a 300-fold surge in demand.

Those on a fixed-rate plan — paying the same monthly amount throughout their contract – make up the majority of those in Texas, but those whose plans vary based on the market are in trouble.

Ty Williams told WFAA-TV that his bill last month for his home, guest house, and office was $660; this month he owes more than $17,000.

“How in the world can anyone pay that?” Williams asked.

Dallas residents Royce Pierce and his wife, Danielle, saw the electric bill for their three-bedroom home rise by almost $10,000, according to NBC News.

Some 14 million Texans continue to experience water outages, forcing residents to boil water for drinking.

President Joe Biden on Saturday declared a major disaster in Texas following the winter storms. Residents can apply for funds, which, the White House noted, includes grants for temporary housing, funds for home repairs, and “low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses.”

Mercifully, the state’s power grid returned to life after five days of blackouts, and although all Texas power plants were up and running, more than 195,000 homes were still without electricity on Friday.

On Saturday morning, 35 cities including Memphis, Dallas and Baton Rouge, will still have record low temperatures.

Houston residents probably will have to boil tap water in the fourth-largest American city until Sunday or Monday, said Mayor Sylvester Turner.

A warming trend is expected to relieve some of the pressure on the region throughout Saturday, the National Weather Service said.

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