Socially Awkward: A Business Owner Spends $45 Million on Facebook Ads, Then FB Deleted His Account.

FILE - This March 29, 2018 file photo shows the Facebook logo on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. Individuals linked to Russia and the French military used fake Facebook and Instagram accounts to wage a covert disinformation campaign in the Central African Republic ahead of elections there this month, Facebook announced this week. Facebook said on Thursday, Dec. 17, 2020 it took down hundreds of accounts and groups linked to France and Russia accused of “coordinated inauthentic behavior” in CAR as well as other countries in Africa and the Middle East. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

The angry, sad and palms-up shoulder-shrug emojis might help – if Jordan Nabigon could access his Facebook account.

Nabigon, a CEO who spent millions in Facebook advertising, saw his company’s main page removed from the platform in October.

The head of Shared, an Ottawa, Ontario, content-curation site, said Facebook provided no advance notice or explanation.

In a Business Insider story, Nabigon is reported to have spent $45,870,181 on Facebook advertising between 2006 and 2020 for Shared and his other company, Freebies, according to expense reports.

“We didn’t do anything wrong and I’m confident in that,” Nabigon said in an interview with Business Insider. “Even if there was something that was off, there’s no way it was worth this kind of reaction from Facebook.”

Nabigon, who said Shared has 21 million followers and employs three full-timers and 12 contract writers, has also been locked out of his personal account.

He said he was told he violated terms and conditions, adding that Facebook offered no further details and cited “safety and security” as reasons not to elaborate.

Facebook representatives did not respond to the publication’s requests for comment.

Nabigon told Business Insider he’d had a Facebook ad representative from 2012 to 2017. But in 2017, Facebook emailed Nabigon telling him he would not have an account representative “for the time being.” He’s been working only with customer service and receiving “canned answers” since.

Nabigon appears to have been among the many business owners affected by Facebook’s increased reliance on artificial intelligence during the pandemic.

“I think there’s a lot of strength in keeping the real people who are supposed to be monitoring the AI or the policy enforcement,” Nabigon said. “We need somebody to look at the nuance and the complexity of our business, especially considering [that] our history with (Facebook) is long.”

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