Silence Is Golden. Some White-Noise Podcasts Are Making Big Bucks.

FILE- This March 20, 2018, file photo shows the Spotify app on an iPad in Baltimore. Music streaming service Spotify is buying podcast companies Gimlet and Anchor as it looks to take on Apple's popular iTunes' podcasting platform. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

True crime is a very popular category. So are sports, politics, and business topics. You know what else can drive massive download numbers and big bucks for podcasters? Nothing. Seriously, no talking, ranting, preaching, or bloviating. Just good old white noise. 

Breaking into the podcast scene lately are quiet and calming programs with names like “Deep Sleep Sounds,” “Relaxing White Noise,” “Best Noise Labs,” and “Calming White Noise.”

Bloomberg chronicles the story of a many named Todd Moore, who lives in the Florida Keys. Back in 2009, he quit his job in cybersecurity and created an app called White Noise. Three years ago, he turned his passion for quiet into a podcast called “Tmsoft’s White Noise Sleep Sounds.”  He posted it on Spotify through the Anchor software, allowing creators to post a podcast for free. People started listening in a big way. 

Moore told Bloomberg he’s pulling in roughly 50,000 listeners per day.  How would that stack up with the million-plus podcasts floating around the airwaves? In the top 25%. 

While he does offer a subscription service for his white noise network, most of his podcast listeners choose the free version supported by ads. He is paid by Anchor this way; $12.25 for every 1,000 listeners.  The cash is rolling in for Moore, too, as he makes $612.50 per day and over $18,000 per month.  

Here’s what Moore told Bloomberg about his accidental success. 

“I never thought writing a little app on a weekend would turn into my full-time life. You just never know.”

Another Florida resident is doing even better. Brandon Reed created a white noise podcast on Spotify through Anchor three years ago for one reason; to help his baby fall asleep. He had not aspired to be a prominent podcaster, but the Spotify algorithm helped him by pushing people to his show called “12 Hour Sand Machines.”

He’s getting 100,000 listeners every day, and at one point last year, it was the 15th most popular podcast in the world. 

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