One Valuable “Jobs” Application. The Document Steve Jobs Sent A Company After Dropping Out Of College Sells For Big Bucks.

** FILE ** Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds up an Apple iPhone at the MacWorld Conference in San Francisco, in this Jan. 9, 2007 file photo. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File) ** zu unserem KORR. APD7270 **

The young man, Steve Jobs, had just dropped out of Reed College in Portland, Ore., and filled out a single-page job application.

That 1973 event is believed to have resulted in what became a six-figure auction item via Charterfields in London. The late Apple Inc. co-founder’s application sold for about $222,400 on Wednesday.

 It was just a year later that Jobs’ career really got going. He joined Atari as a technician and would meet Steve Wozniak there.

It was that combo who founded Apple in 1976.

The auction ran from Feb. 24-March 24, with the application listed in very good condition. In fact, it proved to be quite an investment for the prior owner, who purchased Jobs’ application at auction in 2018 for more than $175,000.

Among the highlights on the document, Jobs:

  • Highlighted “English literature” as his major.
  • Listed “electronics tech or design engineer – digital” as special abilities.
  • Emphasized his skills in computers and calculators.
  • Said no to the questioin of whether he had a phone.
  • Said yes as to whether he had a driver’s license.
  • Said “possible but not probable” to the question of whether he had access to transportation.

Items with Jobs’ signature are comparatively rare because Jobs was reluctant to sign for admirers. 

Various items have included a Fortune magazine signed by Jobs that went up for auction last year at a minimum bid of $11,000, the first issue of Macworld sold for $47,775 in 2018, a Pixar poster sold for $31,250 in 2019 and a floppy disk for Macintosh System Tools for $7,500 in 2019. 

According to Charterfields, the application was in a good condition with some creasing, light staining and old clear tape on the top edge. 

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