“He’s A Little Odd.” As More Information Is Learned About Nashville Bomber, It Paints A Picture Of A Strange Loner.

Nashville Police officer Brenna Hosey speaks at a news conference Sunday, Dec. 27, 2020, in Nashville, Tenn. Hosey is one of six officers credited with evacuating people before an explosion took place in downtown Nashville early Christmas morning. Behind Hosey are Officer Michael Sipos, center, and Officer Richard Luellen, right. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

The case of the Nashville bomber sticks to the classic narrative of an odd loner.

There is no confirmed motive for Anthony Quinn Warner, 63, to cause an explosion of his RV in downtown Nashville that killed him and damaged 41 buildings without taking another life. A source told Nashville’s NBC affiliate that Warner feared 5G technology.

“Some people would say he’s a little odd,” 25-year-neighbor Steve Schmoldt told The Tennessean. “You never saw anyone come and go. Never saw him go anywhere. As far as we knew, he was kind of a computer geek that worked at home.”

That is the gist of what came from his hometown newspaper’s deep dive into his life in the Antioch neighborhood, where he grew up and bought a home that he only shared with pets. The Tennessean reported that he had not been on law enforcement radar, having no criminal activity since a 1978 drug felony that put him on a two-year probation.

The Tennessean found behavior that apparently led to Friday’s bombing. Warner added a gate to the fence that he constructed around his house, which had security cameras outside, and moved the RV into his yard after parking it on the street for years. Last month, he transferred a house deed to a 29-year-old Los Angeles woman for free after previously doing the same with another nearby house. He also informed a company that he was no longer working in information technology after being a contractor with it for more than four years.

Warner had no public presence until Friday when the FBI believed he acted alone in packing the RV with explosives in front of a downtown AT&T building. A digitized female voice issued warnings to evacuate the area, intermittently playing the 1964 “Downtown” song by Petula Clark.

Those lyrics eerily read, “When you’re alone and life is making you lonely, you can always go downtown.”

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