Christmas Buy The Numbers: Here’s What, Why And How American’s Spend Their Money During The Holiday Season.

FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2020 file photo, a shopper walks by a holiday window display in New York. Many of us won’t be celebrating the holidays with our families this year, so gift-giving might feel like the best way to show love from afar. And while shoppers are planning to spend less this year than last, according to a NerdWallet survey, more are also planning to use credit cards to purchase gifts. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

Holiday celebrations may be small this year … but consumers are still expected to spend big. We studied a bunch of surveys and crunched a lot of numbers and here’s what we learned about consumers around Christmas time:

In 2019, U.S. households spent an average of $1,496 during the Christmas holidays, but only about a third of that was on gifts. The other thousand bucks went towards entertaining, going out and buying outfits for those festive get-togethers. This year, we can safely assume Americans are experiencing a significant cost savings (since pajama bottoms and pizza deliveries run pretty cheap).

In recent years, more than 60% of people in the U.S. say they prefer to buy their holiday gifts online. This year, most people in the country are having a hard time remembering what the inside of a store looks like.

Still, a quarter of a million Americans say they are going to get a box full of debt under their Christmas tree. Shoppers expect to be around $554 in debt once the holidays are over. Most can’t blame their spouse for the high interest. either. Couples, on average, say they spend only around $123 on their significant other.

If you are planning to buy for the wife, surveys say she likes ice (as in diamonds).  Forty-seven percent of the ladies say they want jewelry under the tree. A slightly lower percentage (46%) would be thrilled to get a weekend break or a holiday.

Pre-pandemic, 62% of Americans buy their gifts in the week before Christmas. In fact, spending statistics show that 7% of people do their shopping on the day before Christmas.

Holiday celebrations may be small this year … but consumers are still expected to spend big. We studied a bunch of surveys and crunched a lot of numbers and here’s what we learned about consumers around Christmas time:

Last year, U.S. households spent an average of $1,496 during the Christmas holidays, but only about a third of that was on gifts. The other thousand bucks went towards entertaining, going out and buying outfits for those festive get-togethers. This year, we can safely assume Americans are experiencing a significant cost savings (since pajama bottoms and pizza deliveries run pretty cheap).

In recent years, more than 60% of people in the U.S. say they prefer to buy their holiday gifts online. This year, most people in the country are having a hard time remembering what the inside of a store looks like.

Still, a quarter of a million Americans say they are going to get a box full of debt under their Christmas tree. Shoppers expect to be around $554 in debt once the holidays are over. Most can’t blame their spouse for the high interest. either. Couples, on average, say they spend only around $123 on their significant other.

If you are planning to buy for the wife, surveys say she likes ice (as in diamonds).  Forty-seven percent of the ladies say they want jewelry under the tree. A slightly lower percentage (46%) would be thrilled to get a weekend break or a holiday.

Pre-pandemic, 62% of Americans buy their gifts in the week before Christmas. In fact, spending statistics show that 7% of people do their shopping on the day before Christmas.

A few other interesting figures:

19% of Christmas shoppers buy gifts for themselves, too. Nearly a quarter (23. 6%) of people would reveal personal information just to get special deals. Also, pollsters at Census Wide say nearly half of us are big fat liars around the holidays … with 46% of the people surveyed saying they have lied about liking a gift.

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